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Promotive, Preventive, Curative and Rehabilitative health care providers.

Uganda Protestant Medical Bureau (UPMB) is the coordinating body for the Protestant Health Services in Uganda. UPMB is a network of 311 faith-based health institutions in Uganda. Founded in 1957 to serve as a liaison between the Government of Uganda, donors and member hospitals, UPMB now serves as a National umbrella organization with a wider mandate and membership from all over the country.

Our Mission

To Empower Member Health Facilities To Provide Sustainable Quality Services For the Glory Of God

Our Vision

Preferred Christian Health Care Partner For Sustainable Services

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+256 200 927 177

65Years of Operation

what we do

Providing Quality Health Care Services.

Project Planning and Programming

Over the years, UPMB has steadily built its project portfolio around the program areas that strengthen and compliment the services that its members health facilities provide. These projects are designed under the broad thematic/focus areas of; HV/AIDS treatment and Care, Health System Strengthening, Family Health and Non-Communicable Diseases. Our programs are aligned to our strategic plan of Research & Development of strategic centers of excellence. This makes our programming flexible and adaptive to evolves with emerging issues in the health sector.

Coordination

Coordination has been positioned as a key program area with the intention of ensuring adequate resources for coordination activities. This will involve coordination of all member units, other partners such as the bureaus, government ministries and agencies, and the training institutions. Coordination will address issues affecting quality service delivery, resource mobilization and policy support. Therefore coordination will involve information sharing, joint activities and provision of leadership.

Accreditation

UPMB has an accredited total of 277 Health facilities including Hospitals, HCIV’s, HCIII’s, HCII’s and Health Training Institutions and is continuously work round the clock to not only increasing these numbers but also ensure quality and patient safety are paramount.

Optical Services

UPMB Optical Centre was established in 1979 to provide affordable and quality optical services to Ugandans with the aim of exceeding every client’s expectations by offering outstanding customer service, flexibility in service provision and ensuring value for money for the client. The Centre currently has a client base of over 3000, and emphasis is on professionalism, diligence and hard work.

Clearing and forwarding services

UPMB provides clearing and forwarding services. Both air and sea freight services for individual member units and church related programs and projects are handled. These include pharmaceuticals, medical equipment and machines, motor vehicles, personal effects for expatriate staff and relief goods. This service is done at a subsidized cost without compromising speed and efficiency.

Work permits handling

Work permits for expatriates working with member institutions and church related bodies are processed by the UPMB secretariat. The processing unit handles operational licenses and annual practicing licenses for member units and medical doctors both local and foreign.
WHAT’S NEW

Our Latest News And Blog Posts

April 21, 2022

Reasons why you should visit the doctor regularly.

The omicron variant of the coronavirus has been dominant in the U.S. since December, but the version of omicron that drove the major infection surge during the winter now accounts for less than 7 percent of new cases.

A more transmissible subvariant, BA.2, accounts for around three-quarters of U.S. cases. And BA.2, in turn, has spawned its own sublineage, BA.2.12.1, which appears to be gaining steam: It rose from 7 percent of U.S. cases in early April to 19 percent last week. The New York State Health Department said last week that BA.2.12.1 was most likely contributing to the state’s rise in case numbers.

So far, the key difference between the newer versions of omicron and the one that previously rocketed through the U.S. is transmissibility. The White House’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, has estimated that BA.2 is 50 percent more transmissible than the original omicron lineage.

But the coldlike symptoms vaccinated and boosted people feel as a result of an omicron infection are mostly the same regardless of the subvariant.

“The omicron symptoms have been pretty consistent. There’s less incidence of people losing their sense of taste and smell. In a lot of ways, it’s a bad cold, a lot of respiratory symptoms, stuffy nose, coughing, body aches and fatigue,” said Dr. Dennis Cunningham, the system medical director of infection control and prevention at Henry Ford Health in Detroit.

Symptoms of the BA.2 subvariant

The Zoe COVID Symptom Study in the U.K. has enabled hundreds of thousands of people to self-report their symptoms through smartphone apps.

One of the apps’ co-founders, Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, said that based on Zoe data, a runny nose is still the most common symptom of omicron, followed by fatigue, a sore throat, sneezing and headache.

“The changes from BA.1 to BA.2 have been quite subtle — perhaps runny nose and fatigue [are] going up,” he said.

Spector said 84 percent of people in the U.K. who logged symptoms lately said they had runny noses, compared to around 73 percent in early January. Seventy-two percent said they had fatigue, up from 68 percent during the first omicron wave.

But it’s hard to attribute those changes directly to a subvariant, Spector said, because there are many confounding factors.

What should we make of all these omicron lineages?

BA.1 and BA.2 are about as genetically similar as delta was to alpha, experts said. Differences between the subvariants could influence the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody treatments.

“We know even with BA.1 and BA.2, which are both subtypes of omicron, that different monoclonal antibodies work for one but don’t work for the other,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

But experts generally agree that the public shouldn’t worry too much about the emergence of each omicron subvariant.

April 21, 2022

Know your health status.

The omicron variant of the coronavirus has been dominant in the U.S. since December, but the version of omicron that drove the major infection surge during the winter now accounts for less than 7 percent of new cases.

A more transmissible subvariant, BA.2, accounts for around three-quarters of U.S. cases. And BA.2, in turn, has spawned its own sublineage, BA.2.12.1, which appears to be gaining steam: It rose from 7 percent of U.S. cases in early April to 19 percent last week. The New York State Health Department said last week that BA.2.12.1 was most likely contributing to the state’s rise in case numbers.

So far, the key difference between the newer versions of omicron and the one that previously rocketed through the U.S. is transmissibility. The White House’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, has estimated that BA.2 is 50 percent more transmissible than the original omicron lineage.

But the coldlike symptoms vaccinated and boosted people feel as a result of an omicron infection are mostly the same regardless of the subvariant.

“The omicron symptoms have been pretty consistent. There’s less incidence of people losing their sense of taste and smell. In a lot of ways, it’s a bad cold, a lot of respiratory symptoms, stuffy nose, coughing, body aches and fatigue,” said Dr. Dennis Cunningham, the system medical director of infection control and prevention at Henry Ford Health in Detroit.

Symptoms of the BA.2 subvariant

The Zoe COVID Symptom Study in the U.K. has enabled hundreds of thousands of people to self-report their symptoms through smartphone apps.

One of the apps’ co-founders, Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, said that based on Zoe data, a runny nose is still the most common symptom of omicron, followed by fatigue, a sore throat, sneezing and headache.

“The changes from BA.1 to BA.2 have been quite subtle — perhaps runny nose and fatigue [are] going up,” he said.

Spector said 84 percent of people in the U.K. who logged symptoms lately said they had runny noses, compared to around 73 percent in early January. Seventy-two percent said they had fatigue, up from 68 percent during the first omicron wave.

But it’s hard to attribute those changes directly to a subvariant, Spector said, because there are many confounding factors.

What should we make of all these omicron lineages?

BA.1 and BA.2 are about as genetically similar as delta was to alpha, experts said. Differences between the subvariants could influence the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody treatments.

“We know even with BA.1 and BA.2, which are both subtypes of omicron, that different monoclonal antibodies work for one but don’t work for the other,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

But experts generally agree that the public shouldn’t worry too much about the emergence of each omicron subvariant.

April 21, 2022

Chronic Headache can be a sign of something more.

The omicron variant of the coronavirus has been dominant in the U.S. since December, but the version of omicron that drove the major infection surge during the winter now accounts for less than 7 percent of new cases.

A more transmissible subvariant, BA.2, accounts for around three-quarters of U.S. cases. And BA.2, in turn, has spawned its own sublineage, BA.2.12.1, which appears to be gaining steam: It rose from 7 percent of U.S. cases in early April to 19 percent last week. The New York State Health Department said last week that BA.2.12.1 was most likely contributing to the state’s rise in case numbers.

So far, the key difference between the newer versions of omicron and the one that previously rocketed through the U.S. is transmissibility. The White House’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, has estimated that BA.2 is 50 percent more transmissible than the original omicron lineage.

But the coldlike symptoms vaccinated and boosted people feel as a result of an omicron infection are mostly the same regardless of the subvariant.

“The omicron symptoms have been pretty consistent. There’s less incidence of people losing their sense of taste and smell. In a lot of ways, it’s a bad cold, a lot of respiratory symptoms, stuffy nose, coughing, body aches and fatigue,” said Dr. Dennis Cunningham, the system medical director of infection control and prevention at Henry Ford Health in Detroit.

Symptoms of the BA.2 subvariant

The Zoe COVID Symptom Study in the U.K. has enabled hundreds of thousands of people to self-report their symptoms through smartphone apps.

One of the apps’ co-founders, Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, said that based on Zoe data, a runny nose is still the most common symptom of omicron, followed by fatigue, a sore throat, sneezing and headache.

“The changes from BA.1 to BA.2 have been quite subtle — perhaps runny nose and fatigue [are] going up,” he said.

Spector said 84 percent of people in the U.K. who logged symptoms lately said they had runny noses, compared to around 73 percent in early January. Seventy-two percent said they had fatigue, up from 68 percent during the first omicron wave.

But it’s hard to attribute those changes directly to a subvariant, Spector said, because there are many confounding factors.

What should we make of all these omicron lineages?

BA.1 and BA.2 are about as genetically similar as delta was to alpha, experts said. Differences between the subvariants could influence the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody treatments.

“We know even with BA.1 and BA.2, which are both subtypes of omicron, that different monoclonal antibodies work for one but don’t work for the other,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

But experts generally agree that the public shouldn’t worry too much about the emergence of each omicron subvariant.

April 21, 2022

As original omicron disappears, these are the BA.2 subvariant’s key differences

The omicron variant of the coronavirus has been dominant in the U.S. since December, but the version of omicron that drove the major infection surge during the winter now accounts for less than 7 percent of new cases.

A more transmissible subvariant, BA.2, accounts for around three-quarters of U.S. cases. And BA.2, in turn, has spawned its own sublineage, BA.2.12.1, which appears to be gaining steam: It rose from 7 percent of U.S. cases in early April to 19 percent last week. The New York State Health Department said last week that BA.2.12.1 was most likely contributing to the state’s rise in case numbers.

So far, the key difference between the newer versions of omicron and the one that previously rocketed through the U.S. is transmissibility. The White House’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, has estimated that BA.2 is 50 percent more transmissible than the original omicron lineage.

But the coldlike symptoms vaccinated and boosted people feel as a result of an omicron infection are mostly the same regardless of the subvariant.

“The omicron symptoms have been pretty consistent. There’s less incidence of people losing their sense of taste and smell. In a lot of ways, it’s a bad cold, a lot of respiratory symptoms, stuffy nose, coughing, body aches and fatigue,” said Dr. Dennis Cunningham, the system medical director of infection control and prevention at Henry Ford Health in Detroit.

Symptoms of the BA.2 subvariant

The Zoe COVID Symptom Study in the U.K. has enabled hundreds of thousands of people to self-report their symptoms through smartphone apps.

One of the apps’ co-founders, Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, said that based on Zoe data, a runny nose is still the most common symptom of omicron, followed by fatigue, a sore throat, sneezing and headache.

“The changes from BA.1 to BA.2 have been quite subtle — perhaps runny nose and fatigue [are] going up,” he said.

Spector said 84 percent of people in the U.K. who logged symptoms lately said they had runny noses, compared to around 73 percent in early January. Seventy-two percent said they had fatigue, up from 68 percent during the first omicron wave.

But it’s hard to attribute those changes directly to a subvariant, Spector said, because there are many confounding factors.

What should we make of all these omicron lineages?

BA.1 and BA.2 are about as genetically similar as delta was to alpha, experts said. Differences between the subvariants could influence the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody treatments.

“We know even with BA.1 and BA.2, which are both subtypes of omicron, that different monoclonal antibodies work for one but don’t work for the other,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

But experts generally agree that the public shouldn’t worry too much about the emergence of each omicron subvariant.

UPMB currently has a Network of 313 faith based private not for profit health facilities (including Hospitals, Health Facilities and 18 Health Training Institutions) spanning over five decades of experience in serving vulnerable communities in Uganda with a common goal of providing preventive, promotive, curative, and rehabilitative affordable, good quality health care to Ugandans regardless of ethnicity and religious creed. Their presence is strong in rural areas reaching the most marginalized and vulnerable groups of society.

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EXPLORE RECENT PROJECTS

Explore Our Latest Projects And Recent Works

Family Health projects

FAM/IRH FAMILY PLANNING PROJECT

The Fertility Awareness Methods (FAM) and Fertility Awareness (FA) Education project is a partnership between Institute of Reproductive Health (IRH), George University with Uganda Protestant Medical Bureau (UPMB). The one-year (1st June 2021 to 30th June 2022) project targets women and men of reproductive age with family planning information and methods.

The project goal is to improve access and utilization of FAM services into UPMBs Local Family Planning (FP) Program. The intended objectives include;

  1. Improved coordination of Family Planning including FAM and FP Education at national and sub-national level.
  2. Improved capacity of UPMB facilities to integrate FAM and FA Education into local FP programs.
  3. Strengthened advocacy for FAM and FA Education services
  4. Enhanced use of icyclebeads mobile app to document and report on FAM outcomes.

The project will be implemented in 3 districts in central region targeting 8 health facilities.

KIBOGA DISTRICT KASANDA DISTRICT MITYANA DISTRICT
St. James Masiriba HC III Kitikolo HCII Namutamba HCIII
Nabwendo HC III Kyanamugera HCIII, Maama Norah HCII
Bamusuuta HCII Makonzi HCIII

 

The project is working with Health Workers, VHTs and Religious Leaders to implement the project in the above facilities, communities and Churches.

Family Health projects

DINU – LEWA

The Development Initiative for Northern Uganda (DINU) – Livelihood Enhancement for West Nile and Acholi (LEWA), is a development project funded by Uganda Government – Office of the Prime Minister with support from European Union (EU). The project is implemented in a consortium led by Lutheran World Federation a long side Uganda Protestant Medical Bureau (UPMB), Danish Church Aid (DCA), and Mukwano Group of Companies.

The overall objective of project is  to  improve Livelihoods in West Nile and Northern region through integrated complementary interventions of increased production, marketing, nutrition, and family planning programs.

UPMB contributes to Strong Nutrition and Family Planning Interventions across the five project implementing Districts of Arua, Maracha, Koboko, Madi-Okollo, Yumbe, and only Family planning in four districts of Obongi, Lamwo, Moyo and Adjumani . The project shall be implemented for thirty-six months (10 January 2020 to 31 December 2022).

Family Health projects

USAID UGANDA FAMILY PLANNING ACTIVITY

USAID Uganda Family Planning Activity is a five years (2020-2025) project  being implemented by Pathfinder in partnership with Uganda Protestant Medical Bureau (UPMB). The activity aims to address underlying social, cultural, and structural barriers to family planning access, particularly among adolescents, youth, first-time parents, and low-parity women in 11 districts across Uganda.

Objectives

  1. Through leadership and coordination strengthened to support voluntary Family Planning
  2. Positive social norms and behaviors enhanced to improve “Healthy Timing and Spacing of Pregnancy (HTSP)
  3. Access to quality, voluntary Family Planning increased.
partners and donors

Here are our Development Partners